The Individualized Education Program as a Living Document

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Season 2, Episode 2 — 7 August 2017

About this episode

In preparation for the return to school, the theme of the current issue of our membership magazine is “The Individualized Education Program as a living document”. We talk with Amy Toson, the guest editor of this issue, about what the IEP as a living document means and how to implement such a vision in your meeting or school.

This issue is free to members and non-members alike for the month of August. To read the entire issue, visit

About the presenters

A color portrait of Amy Toson, a woman with dark blond hair parted slightly to her left. She is smiling and wearing a peach colored sleeveless top and a gold chain around her neck.Amy L-M Toson, Ph.D. has been working both nationally and internationally for well over fifteen years in the area of inclusive community and school capacity building and systems change. She began her career as a community inclusion facilitator and K-12 inclusive education teacher. She then moved into the role of consultant and professor working with families, teachers and leaders across the globe facilitating effective inclusion for all learners, paying special attention to those who are traditionally marginalized and segregated, such as students with intensive support needs. Currently, Amy is an Assistant Professor and Special Education Ph.D. Program Chair within the College of Education and Leadership at Cardinal Stritch University. She researches and teaches doctoral courses on multi-dimensional capacity building, leading/building inclusive systems and communities, doctoral research symposium, and legal and political analysis. Amy received her Ph.D. from the University of South Florida within the Departments of Educational Leadership/Policy Studies and Special Education in 2013. She now resides in the suburbs of Dallas, Texas and is taking up action for building inclusive communities across the lifespan there.

A portrait of Donald Taylor, a man with a medium smile and a mob of curly dark hair in a black collared shirt against a pattern of a blue pained wrought-iron gateDonald Taylor is responsible for membership and chapters at TASH and is the producer of Amplified.


Announcer: You’re listening to TASH Amplified, a podcast that seeks to transform research and experience concerning inclusion and equity for people with disabilities into solutions people can use in their everyday lives.

TASH just released the latest issue of our quarterly member magazine, Connections, the theme of which is “The Individualized Education Program as a living document”. Today we are talking with Amy Toson, the guest editor of the special edition, about what the IEP as a living document means and how to implement such a vision.

Musical introduction

Complete transcript forthcoming

Announcer: You’ve been listening to TASH Amplified. For more about the series, including show notes, links to articles discussed, a complete transcript and a schedule of episodes, visit You can subscribe through iTunes or your favorite Android podcast app to have the series delivered automatically to your device so you never miss an episode. If you enjoyed today’s episode, please share it with your friends and on your social networks.

Today we talked with Amy Toson, the guest editor of the latest issue of our membership magazine, Connections, on “the IEP as a living document”. We’re sufficiently excited about this issue that we are making it available to members and non-members alike, free for the month of August. To read the entire issue, visit You can also read about our other IEP-related campaign there, dedicated to raising awareness of the recent Supreme Court decision concerning special education, Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District. The campaign takes its name from a sentence from Chief Justice John Robert’s unanimous decision, where he writes, “The IEP is not a form”. Prepare for the upcoming school year by visiting

TASH is a values and research-based advocacy association with an over 40-year record advocating for the rights of people with disabilities. TASH is a coalition that unites people with disabilities, researchers, educators, service providers, family members and others in the cause of guaranteeing that people with disabilities are able participate in all aspects of life. In addition to this podcast series, we offer a scholarly quarterly, Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities, a popular magazine, Connections, local chapters coving 18 states, a series of webinars and regional conferences, and our annual conference. The theme for our 2017 annual conference is “Still We Rise for Equity, Opportunity, and Inclusion”. The conference will be in Atlanta, Georgia, from December 13th through 15th, and will feature about a 1,000 attendees and 300 presentations by researchers, self-advocates, family members, educators, agency personnel and other experts and advocates. You can learn more and register for the conference at You can receive updates from TASH on this podcast and our other activities by following us on Facebook or on twitter at @TASHtweet.

Music for TASH Amplified is an original composition and performance by Sunny Cefaratti, the Co-Director and Autistic Self Advocacy Mentor at the Musical Autist. You can learn more about the Musical Autist at

This has been a sample of the colleagues and conversations available through TASH. It is only because of the excellent work that our members do that we can bring you this information. For more resources such as this and to become a member, visit

We’ll hear from another outstanding advocate again in two weeks.

Musical coda

This interview was originally recorded on 1 August 2017.

This transcript has been lightly edited for clarity.

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